There It Is! Philae Lander Found

Philae has been found! Credit: Main image and lander inset: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA; context: ESA/Rosetta/ NavCam.

The search is over, and looking at these images, no wonder it was so hard to find the little Philae lander!

The high-resolution camera on board the Rosetta spacecraft has finally spotted Philae “wedged into a dark crack on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko,” the ESA team said. They also said that now, seeing the lander’s orientation, it’s clear why establishing communications was so difficult following its landing on November 12, 2014.

Rosetta, orbiting the comet and getting ready for its own demise/touchdown on 67P, focused its OSIRIS narrow-angle camera towards a few candidate sites on September 2, 2016 as the orbiter came just 2.7 km of the comet’s surface. Clearly visible in the zoomed in versions are the main body of the lander, along with two of its three legs.

“With only a month left of the Rosetta mission, we are so happy to have finally imaged Philae, and to see it in such amazing detail,” says Cecilia Tubiana of the OSIRIS camera team, the first person to see the images when they were downlinked from Rosetta on September 4.

The Philae lander was last seen after it first touched down at a region called Agilkia on the odd-shaped, two-lobed comet 67P. During its dramatic touchdown, the lander flew, landed, bounced and then repeated that process for more than two hours across the surface, with three or maybe four touchdowns. The harpoons that were to anchor Philae to the surface failed to fire, and scientists estimated the lander may have bounced as high as 3.2 kilometers (2 miles) before becoming wedged in the shadows of a cliff on the comet. After three days, Philae’s primary battery ran out of power and the lander went into hibernation, only to wake up again and communicate briefly with Rosetta in June and July 2015 as the comet came closer to the Sun and more power was available.

But after more than a year of silence, the Rosetta team announced in mid-August 2016 that they would no longer attempt communications with Philae.

Philae’s final location had been plotted but until yesterday, never actually seen by Rosetta’s cameras. Radio ranging data was used to narrow down the search to an area spanning a few tens of meters, and a number of potential candidate objects were identified in relatively low-resolution images taken from larger distances.

Compare some of the features of the cliff in the image above to this image taken by Philae of its surroundings:

“After months of work, with the focus and the evidence pointing more and more to this lander candidate, I’m very excited and thrilled that we finally have this all-important picture of Philae sitting in Abydos,” said ESA’s Laurence O’Rourke, who has been coordinating the search efforts over the last months at ESA, with the OSIRIS and SONC/CNES teams.

At 2.7 km, the resolution of the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera is about 5 cm/pixel, which is sufficient to reveal features of Philae’s 1 m-sized body and its legs.

“This wonderful news means that we now have the missing ‘ground-truth’ information needed to put Philae’s three days of science into proper context, now that we know where that ground actually is!” says Matt Taylor, ESA’s Rosetta project scientist.

The discovery comes less than a month before Rosetta descends to the comet’s surface. On September 30, the orbiter will be sent on a final one-way mission to investigate the comet from close up, including the open pits in a region called Ma’at, where it is hoped that critical observations will help to reveal secrets of the body’s interior structure.

“Now that the lander search is finished we feel ready for Rosetta’s landing, and look forward to capturing even closer images of Rosetta’s touchdown site,” adds Holger Sierks, principal investigator of the OSIRIS camera.

The Rosetta team said they would be providing more details about the search as well as more images in the near future.

Source: ESA

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Goodbye Forever Philae; We Hardly Knew Ye

Philae's view via its CIVA instrument after landing. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

You can’t say they didn’t try, but the news is sad nonetheless. ESA announced the mission for the Philae lander – the first spacecraft to ever land on a comet — is officially over. The system that enables communications between the Rosetta spacecraft and Philae – which sitting in a shaded region on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko – is being switched off on July 27, 2016, at 09:00 UTC.

“It’s time for me to say goodbye,” Philae tweeted on Tuesday. “Tomorrow, the unit on @ESA_Rosetta for communication with me will be switched off forever…”

Philae has mostly been in hibernation after its dramatic touchdown (actually, three or maybe four touchdowns) on Nov. 12, 2014 when it separated from the orbiting Rosetta spacecraft, flew, landed, bounced and then repeated that process for more than two hours across the surface. The harpoons that were to anchor Philae to the surface failed to fire, and scientists estimated the lander may have bounced as high as 3.2 kilometers (2 miles) before becoming wedged in the shadows of a cliff on the odd-shaped comet. The solar-powered lander quickly ran out of power, just hours after landing. Philae’s final location has been plotted but never actually seen by Rosetta.

After months of silence, the team heard briefly from Philae on June 13, 2015, when it transmitted information on its power and computer subsystems. It then made seven intermittent contacts with Rosetta in the following weeks, with the last coming on July 9, but the communications were too short and unstable to transmit or receive any meaningful scientific or engineering data.

Since then, the Support System Processor Unit (ESS) on Rosetta was kept on in the unlikely chance that Philae would wake up and try to reestablish contact. The hope was that when the comet was closer to the Sun, it might receive enough light to power up.

But the reason for turning it off now is due to Rosetta’s own impending end of mission, coming on September 30, 2016 when it will make a controlled impact at the Ma’at region on the comet’s “head.” Emily Lakdawalla of The Planetary Society put together this annotated image of sites where Philae touched down and likely landed, and where Rosetta will end up:

The team decided to keep “Rosetta’s listening channel on until it is no longer possible due to power constraints as we move ever further from the Sun towards the end of the mission,” said Patrick Martin, ESA’s Rosetta mission manager.

Martin said that by the end of this week, the spacecraft will be about 520 million km from the Sun, and will start facing a significant loss of power – about 4W per day. In order to continue scientific operations over the next two months and to maximize their return, it became necessary to start reducing the power consumed by the non-essential payload components on board.

But, Martin added that the mission of Philae and Rosetta will always be remembered as an incredible success.

“The combined achievements of Rosetta and Philae, rendezvousing with and landing on a comet, are historic high points in space exploration,” he said.

Philae did achieve 80% of its primary science goals in its short 64-hour active mission, as it took detailed images of the comet from above and on the surface, searched for organic compounds, and profiled the local environment and surface properties of the comet, “providing revolutionary insights into this fascinating world,” ESA said.

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