NASA, NOAA Satellites Track Hurricane Irma’s Path

Record-setting Hurricane Irma barreled over the Caribbean islands of St. Martin, St. Barthelemy and Anguilla early Wednesday, destroying buildings with its sustained winds of 185 mph (297 kph) and rains and storm surges causing major flooding. The US National Hurricane Center listed the Category 5 Irma as the strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded north of […]

The post NASA, NOAA Satellites Track Hurricane Irma’s Path appeared first on Universe Today.

Snowzilla’s East Coast Blast Captured as ‘Rare Thundersnow’ by Scott Kelly on Station and Moonlit from Suomi Satellite

Rare #thundersnow visible from @Space_Station in #blizzard2016!  Jan. 23, 2016. Credit: NASA/Scott Kelly/@StationCDRKelly

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly captured a rare and spectacular display of ‘thundersnow’ from space as Snowzilla’s blast pummeled much of the US East Coast this weekend with two feet or more of paralyzing snow from the nations’ capital to New York City and beyond.

Meanwhile the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Earth orbiting satellite almost simultaneously snapped an eerie image of the East Coast bathed in Moonlight as the ‘Blizzard of 2016’ battered over 85 million residents in 20 states across the East Coast.

The Suomi NPP satellite image of the massive winter storm system pummeling the eastern United States was taken at 2:15 a.m. EST on Jan. 23 by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS).

Kelly captured the spectacular ‘thundersnow’ photo on Saturday, Jan. 23, from his perch aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that approached or set snowfall accumulation records in many major metropolitan areas from the mid Atlantic to the Northeast corridor.

“Rare #thundersnow visible from @Space_Station in #blizzard2016! #Snowzilla #snowmaggedon2016,” Kelly tweeted with a chance shot on Jan 23, 2016.

Because from one moment to the next the “rare thundersnow” vanished from sight – see comparison photos above and below.

“Massive #snowstorm blanketing #EastCoast clearly visible from @Space_Station! Stay safe! #blizzard2016,” Kelly tweeted with a photo earlier on Saturday from a similar vantage point.

Kelly has just passed Day 300 of his historic “1Year ISS Mission” aboard the outpost and is conducting hundreds of experiments aimed at paving the way for multi-year expeditions to the Red Planet.

The Suomi NPP satellite image “was composed through the use of the VIIRS “day-night band,” which detects faint light signals such as city lights, moonlight, airglow, and auroras. In the image, the clouds are lit from above by the nearly full Moon and from below by the lights of the heavily populated East Coast. The city lights are blurred in places by cloud cover.”

Record tides caused extensive flooding, beach erosion and property destruction along a wide section of the Jersey shore. Some areas suffered catastrophic destruction even worse than Hurricane Sandy.

Many airports were closed and are only slowly reopening, wreaking havoc on the air transport system. More than 13,000 flights have been canceled so far since Friday, Jan. 22.

The storm lasted into Sunday, Jan. 24, causing at least 45 deaths.

Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news.

Ken Kremer

The post Snowzilla’s East Coast Blast Captured as ‘Rare Thundersnow’ by Scott Kelly on Station and Moonlit from Suomi Satellite appeared first on Universe Today.

Monster Blizzard of 2016 Strikes US East Coast, Tracked by NASA and NOAA Satellites

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite snapped this image of the approaching blizzard around 2:35 a.m. EST on Jan. 22, 2016 using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument's Day-Night band.   Credit: NOAA/NASA

NEW JERSEY- The monstrous ‘Blizzard of 2016’ predicted by weather forecasters for days has struck a wide swath of the US East Coast from the Gulf coast to the Carolinas to New York and soon into New England, with full fury today, Friday, Jan. 22.

NASA and NOAA satellites are tracking the storm which is already inundating the biggest population centers, affecting some 85 million people up and down the Atlantic Coast, as it moves in a northeasterly direction.

This afternoon, NASA and NOAA released a series of eyepopping satellite images showing the massive extent of the storm, which may drop historic amounts of snow on Washington DC and other cities over the day 24 to 48 hours.

The two agencies released a particularly striking image, shown above, showing the storm swarming over virtually the entire continental US as it was closing in on the East coast cites.

It was taken Friday afternoon by the NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite showing the approaching blizzard around 2:35 a.m. EST on Jan. 22, 2016 using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument’s Day-Night band.

States of Emergency have been declared by Governors of states from Virginia to New England, and the list is growing.

The post Monster Blizzard of 2016 Strikes US East Coast, Tracked by NASA and NOAA Satellites appeared first on Universe Today.

US Braces for Cat 4 Hurricane as ‘Joaquin’ Barrels to East Coast and ULA Readies 100th Launch on Oct. 2

Video caption: This animation of images captured from September 29 to October 1, 2015 from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite shows Hurricane Joaquin become a major hurricane in the Bahamas. Credits: NASA/NOAA GOES Project NEW JERSEY – A wide swath of the US East Coast is bracing for impact in the coming days as ‘Hurricane Joaquin’ strengthened […]

NASA and NOAA Satellites Image Crippling Blizzard of 2015 Pounding New England

Record breaking snow from the ‘Blizzard of 2015’ hit vast regions of the US Northeast today, Jan. 27, 2015, stretching from Long Island to New England. NASA and NOAA Earth orbiting satellites are keeping track of the storm. (…)Read the rest of NASA and NOAA Satellites Image Crippling Blizzard of 2015 Pounding New England (416 […]

Holiday Lights So Bright You Can See ‘em from Space

Call it holiday light creep. A NASA satellite has been tracking the spread of Christmas lighting from 512 miles up for the past three years and according to the data, nighttime lights around many major U.S. cities shine 20 to 50 percent brighter during Christmas and New Year’s when compared to light output during the […]